Saturday, January 30, 2016

Jane Got a Gun (2016) Behind the Scenes - Part 1/3



The Bluebottle or Portuguese Man of War


The Bluebottle or Portuguese Man of War is not a single animal but a colony of four kinds of highly modified individuals (zooids). The zooids are dependent on one another for survival. The float (pneumatophore) is a single individual and supports the rest of the colony. The tentacles (dactylozooids) are polyps concerned with the detection and capture of food and convey their prey to the digestive polyps (gastrozooids). Reproduction is carried out by the gonozooids, another type of polyp.

The float is a bottle or pear-shaped sac that can exceed 15 cm. It is mainly blue, though its upper margin may show delicate shades of green or pink. It is a living, muscular bag that secretes its own gas, which is similar to air. The float has aerodynamic properties and it seems likely that sailing characteristics may be modified by muscular contraction of the crest.


Know more:
http://australianmuseum.net.au/bluebottle#sthash.0q5PADZl.dpuf

Photo credit: Matty Smith
Photo via HousingCamera
http://www.housingcamera.com/blog/featured-photographers/weekly-featured-underwater-photographer-matthew-smith#.Vqm3Qbnn671

More of his work:http://www.mattysmithphoto.com/

5 Scariest Urban Legends And Creepypastas That Might Actually Be True.



Prehistoric violence among nomadic hunter-gatherer communities

 
A pregnant woman with her hands and feet bound. A man with an obsidian blade embedded in his skull. Men and women with arrow wounds to the head and neck.
That’s the grisly scene archaeologists describe at Nataruk, in modern-day Kenya, where they say they’ve uncovered unique evidence of violence in prehistoric, nomadic hunter-gatherer communities.

The massacre they’ve uncovered is striking, they say, because it pushes back against a theory that warfare didn’t become a feature of human culture until communities settled down.

Archaeologists from Cambridge University excavated the remains of 27 people, including at least eight women and six children, in a region that was once the edge of a lagoon, near modern-day Lake Turkana. The remains included 12 skeletons that were fairly complete, “preserved by the particular conditions of the lagoon,” the researchers write in Nature.


Source & further reading:
http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/01/21/463835225/discovery-of-ancient-massacre-suggests-war-predated-settlements

Paper:http://www.nature.com/articles/nature16477.epdf

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Friday, January 29, 2016

This Week in Unnecessary Censorship



Mom’s in control – even before you’re born


Researchers have uncovered previously unappreciated means by which epigenetic information contained in the egg influences the development of the placenta during pregnancy. The research, which was performed in mice, indicates that a mother’s health, even before conception, may influence the health of her fetus, and opens questions on how a mother’s age may influence placental development.

Epigenetic information is not encoded within the DNA sequence but is critical for determining which genes are on or off. One of the ways this is achieved is via DNA methylation, a biological process where the DNA is chemically tagged to silence genes. DNA methylation marks are laid down in each egg during their development in the ovaries and, after fertilization, some of these marks are passed onto the fetus and placenta.

In exploring the purpose of this maternal information in fetal development, focus so far has been on a small number of genes termed ‘imprinted genes’. However, there are nearly one thousand other genomic regions where methylation in the egg cell is passed onto the early embryo. The researchers set out to explore the importance of this type of methylation on the development of the placenta, a vital organ in pregnancy, and their findings are presented in the latest issue of the journal Developmental Cell.


Source & further reading:
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-01/bi-mic012116.php

Kim Basinger to Play Christian Grey’s Former Lover in ‘Fifty Shades Darker’ (EXCLUSIVE)


Universal has now locked in its first new cast member to join its highly successful “Fifty Shades of Grey” franchise, with production set to start this spring.
Kim Basinger is set to play the key role of Elena Lincoln, Christian Grey’s Business partner and former lover in E.L James’ “Fifty Shades Darker,” sources tell Variety.
Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan are returning to reprise their roles of Anastasia Steele and Grey, respectively, with James Foley taking over directing reigns.
Luke Grimes, Eloise Mumford and Max Martini are also returning to the cast, with Michael De Luca and Dana Brunetti producing along with James and Marcus Viscidi. Niall Leonard and James are penning the script.

The character of Lincoln was hinted at in the first installment, setting the stage for a big reveal in the second.

Universal is planning to shoot “Fifty Shades Darker” and the final pic, “Fifty Shades Freed,” back-to-back, so it was important to lock down cast before production began on the sequel.

The Academy Award winner can be seen next in Warner Bros.’ “Nice Guys” opposite Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe. She is repped by APA, Management Production Entertainment and Bloom Hergott.

VARIETY Justin Kroll Film Reporter@krolljvar January 28, 2016 | 02:30PM PT

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